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Aledo Times Record - Aledo, IL
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events -- in cartoon form
Blog: Take precautions against ticks
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By Dave Granlund
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events. Dave has been an editorial cartoonist published in daily newspapers since 1977. Born in Ware, Mass., Granlund began drawing cartoons in grade school and at ...
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Dave Granlund's Editorial Cartoons
National cartoonist Dave Granlund's blog features his take on politics and current events. Dave has been an editorial cartoonist published in daily newspapers since 1977. Born in Ware, Mass., Granlund began drawing cartoons in grade school and at age 16, he was published on the editorial pages of local weekly newspapers. His eight-year enlistment in the USAF included assignments with SAC HQ and with Headquarters Command, where his duties included work as head illustrator for the Presidential Inaugural Subcommittee and providing briefing charts for the White House and support for Air Force One. As part of NATO in Operation Looking Glass with the Airborne Command Post, he was awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal. Dave's newspaper honors include awards from UPI, New England Press Association, International Association of Business Communicators, The Associated Press and Massachusetts Press Association. His work has been nominated numerous times for the Pulitzer Prize. His pastimes and interests include history, wood carving, antique tractors and Swedish language studies.
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By RaeAnn Tucker-Marshall
Oct. 15, 2012 12:01 a.m.

The Environmental Health Division of the Henry and Stark County Health

Departments is warning residents to take precautions against ticks and the

diseases they carry.

"Ticks can transmit a number of diseases through bite," warns Dorothy

David, Environmental Health Director with the Health Department. "As people

are spending more time outdoors during the summer and fall, it is

unreasonable to assume that one can completely eliminate tick exposure.

Therefore, prevention methods should include personal protection and

frequent full body tick checks."

Ticks live in and near wooded areas, tall grass and brush and, if

infected, can spread various diseases, including ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease,

Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia. The ticks, often no bigger than

a pin head, become active and can spread disease any time of the year when

the temperature is 40 degrees Fahrenheit or more at ground level. Ticks,

which have sticky pads on their feet, wait in ankle-high grass and other low

vegetation for a human, a dog or another animal to pass by.

The following activities and circumstances were cited by patients who

have acquired tickborne diseases in areas with vegetation, tall grass or

pastures that serve as tick habitats, most notably when no tick precautions

were taken: camping, hiking/walking dogs, having a residence in a wooded

area or performing yard work/clearing brush/gardening in wooded settings,

playing paintball, mushroom hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles in

vegetation that could harbor ticks, fishing and hunting. Landscapers and

farmers could also be at increased risk.

Several prevention measures can be applied against tickborne diseases.

Performing frequent tick checks and removing ticks promptly reduces the

likelihood of transmission of tickborne diseases. While Lyme disease

transmission from an infected feeding tick requires a day or more, Rocky

Mountain Spotted Fever can be transmitted in as little as 4 hours of

feeding. Exposure to ticks in domestic and recreational areas can be

reduced 50%-90% through simple landscaping practices like removing brush and

leaf litter or creating a buffer pesticides to yards once or twice a year

can decrease the number of nymphal ticks 68%-100%.

For more information on tickborne illness prevention contact the Health

Department at 852-0197 (Henry) or 852-3115 (Stark) or visit our website at

www.henrystarkhealth.com or find us on Facebook at Henry and Stark County

Health Departments.


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