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Aledo Times Record - Aledo, IL
News, Views and Tips on Psychological Health and Well-Being
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About this blog
By Nathan W Gates

Nathan W. Gates will be discussing topics related to health, wellness and psychological well-being. Nathan is a licensed clinical professional counselor at Spoon River Counseling & ...

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Living Well

Nathan W. Gates will be discussing topics related to health, wellness and psychological well-being. Nathan is a licensed clinical professional counselor at Spoon River Counseling & Wellness in Canton.  He also teaches, speaks, writes and, when time allows, fly fishes for any species that will chase a fly.  The fishing is often neglected, as he also has two young children with his wife, Emily.

 

Learn more about his counseling practice here: Spoon River Counseling & Wellness

 

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To learn more about his experience and credentials, visit his LinkedIn profile

 

Recent Posts
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June 12, 2014 3:29 p.m.
By Nathan Gates
Nov. 7, 2013 4:53 p.m.


Well, we're growing cows in test tubes now.  Not cows, actually, just muscle tissue grown from stem cells. In London recently, a news conference was conducted in which two food critics were treated to a burger that was created from "cells from a cow ... turned into strips of muscle combined to make a patty."  The reaction?

Upon tasting the burger, Austrian food researcher Ms Ruetzler said: "I was expecting the texture to be more soft... there is quite some intense taste; it's close to meat, but it's not that juicy. The consistency is perfect, but I miss salt and pepper.

He starts with stem cells extracted from cow muscle tissue. In the laboratory, these are cultured with nutrients and growth-promoting chemicals to help them develop and multiply. Three weeks later, there are more than a million stem cells, which are put into smaller dishes where they coalesce into small strips of muscle about a centimetre long and a few millimetres thick.
These strips are collected into small pellets, which are frozen. When there are enough, they are defrosted and compacted into a patty just before being cooked.
Because the meat is initially white in colour, Helen Breewood - who works with Prof Post - is trying to make the lab-grown muscle look red by adding the naturally-occurring compound myoglobin.

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