NEWS

Jacobs announces local rail improvement projects

Staff Writer
Aledo Times Record

Senator Mike Jacobs (D-Moline) is announcing a number of safety improvement projects throughout the 36th legislative district

that will repair and upgrade rail crossings. This five-year construction plan will bring over $135.4 million in improvements statewide.

"This is a five year plan that will improve public safety by installing and updating rail road crossings," stated Senator Jacobs.  "I am happy that the state is starting on projects that will put people throughout the district to work."  

Local projects will take place throughout Carroll, Henry, Rock Island and Whiteside Counties. The majority of the projects will include adding automated flashing light signals and installing rail gates. Other projects will include the complete reconstruction of certain road crossings because of degradation. These projects will increase safety for motorists and pedestrians along local streets.

A few specific projects include:

* $434,374 to be used in Carroll County for the installation of automated flashing signals and crossing gates;

* $654,654 will be used in Henry County for the installation of automated flashing signals and crossing gates;

* $1,721,121 will be used throughout Rock Island County for upgrading and installing automated flashing signals and crossing gates, as well as resurfacing crossings;

* $247,500 will be used in Whiteside County for the installation of automated flashing signals and crossing gates, as well as reconstructing crossings.

The Grade Crossing Protection Fund is used to make improvements at highway-railroad crossings and bridges that are determined to be in the interest of public safety.  Money in the Fund is appropriated from the Illinois Department of Transportation to assist local counties, townships and municipalities in paying for safety improvements at highway-rail grade crossings on local roads and streets.  

"The funding for these projects will bring additional job opportunities to the district over the next five years," stated Jacobs.